Lovecraft in His Grave, Pondering Race

HPL with Books

HPL

Whenever Lovecraft’s racism is discussed, a common point made is that, had he lived longer, his beliefs may have evolved along with society in general’s. Certainly, we can’t know for sure what Lovecraft’s perspectives would have become, so it’s difficult to either accept or reject this speculation outright. And he did shift his views on any number of subjects, including matters of politics and culture. But I don’t believe his racism would have diminished anywhere near as much as some people hope.

The idea that Lovecraft would have become less racist isn’t the dismissal of the subject that saying Lovecraft was simply a product of his time is. Often, that argument is an attempt at a final word–the late 19th and early 20th centuries were inherently racist, so Lovecraft naturally was; therefore, castigating him for his views is pointless.

Instead, the theory that Lovecraft would have changed continues the conversation at least a little longer. It is generally made by someone grappling with their admiration for a writer who held repugnant views. It is borne of the hope that Lovecraft was capable of becoming better.

I can appreciate this hope. Finding out that someone we admire holds beliefs diametrically opposed to ours can be upsetting. If we regard someone as a hero, we want them to be wholly and fully a hero. But in reality, people are complicated. They can and will embody things we agree with and cherish, along with things we find ugly and disappointing. It’s up to us to decide, on balance, whether we admire them still.

One idea used to bolster the position that Lovecraft would have changed is that he had already done so to some degree. In his later years, so this notion goes, he moved incrementally away from the more shocking written declarations of his younger years. My perspective is that the nature and expression of his racism, including his rationale for it, changed over time. But the bigotry didn’t really diminish or soften.

Lovecraft left behind an incredible amount of writing, and this is from where we can draw many of our conclusions regarding the degree and character of his racism. His fiction reveals his racism in a number of ways, often minor and often easily missed. If that’s all we had, we might indeed think of it as a product of its time. But we have his letters.

So far, at least twenty thousand of his letters have been recovered (and that’s apparently only a fifth of what he actually wrote). In recent years, scholarship on Lovecraft and the publication of a number of these letters have revealed more and more details to an audience hungry for them. Correspondence and juvenilia that might otherwise go unnoticed become record. Lovecraft would be astonished by this. He didn’t expect his stories to survive him, printed as they were in disposable pulp magazines, let alone letters to friends.

Selected Letters

The original five volumes of selected letters, a mere smattering. Many specialized volumes, focusing on correspondence with certain people, have been published since.

Of the things uncovered that shed a brighter light on his racism, one of the earliest and most upsetting examples is not a letter but a poem, written in 1912. The title alone gives you a good idea of what you’re in for: On the Creation of Niggers. I argue that this poem is more baldly racist than any of Lovecraft’s stories, including “He” and “The Horror at Red Hook.” Some have pointed out that paying attention to the poem is unfair–it wasn’t published in his lifetime, and it isn’t a mature work. And indeed, few people knew about it until recently, including his fans. But this is the downside to increasing awareness of an author. The poem survived; and, with the Internet, it is easily sought after or stumbled upon. I don’t think we can dismiss it as a youthful indiscretion. He was twenty-two when he wrote it, which hardly makes him a child. While he may not have written anything quite like it in the remaining twenty-five years of his life, he wrote plenty in public and private that reveals his racism.

As I say, his letters, thousands of which have been published, highlight his thought and its development and changes over the forty-six years of his life, including his racism. I certainly have not read all of the letters that have survived, but, between the ones I have and various biographies and essays, I think I have a good handle on him. And I definitely don’t need to provide mention and analysis of every single one of his statements regarding race that I’ve read. We’ll all be here a long time if I do that.

Lovecraft and Sonia Greene

The married couple walking in Brooklyn

In 1925, thirteen years after writing the infamous poem, Lovecraft married and moved to New York. The initial excitement of the new city and larger circle of friends soon wore off. A large portion of his dissatisfaction came from being surrounded by foreigners, Jews, and black people, and he expressed it strongly in letters during and after the time he spent there. In January of 1926, while still ostensibly married to his Jewish wife, Sonia Greene, he wrote the following in a letter to his aunt Lillian Clark:

The mass of contemporary Jews are hopeless as far as America is concerned. They are the product of alien blood, and inherit alien ideals, impulses, and emotions which forever preclude the possibility of wholesale assimilation . . . . The fact is, that an Asiatic stock broken and dragged through the dirt for untold centuries cannot possibly meet a proud, play-loving, warlike Nordic race on an emotional parity . . . . Two elements so discordant can never build up one society–no feeling of real linkage can exist where so vast a disparity of ancestral memories is concerned–so that wherever the Wandering Jew wanders, he will have to content himself with his own society till he disappears or is killed off in some sudden outburst of mad physical loathing on our part . . . . Superior Semites . . . can be assimilated one by one by the dominant Aryan when they sever all ties of association and memory with the mass of organized Jewry.

He goes on to talk about how disgusting and unassimilable various other “races” are (though the “Nordic Irish of Eastern Ireland and such of the French-Canadians as are of Norman extraction” may assimilate after a very slow process).

For Lovecraft during this period, other races were scum both physically and culturally. And genetics and history inextricably intertwined with each other (note the references to “ancestral memories” above). Race was a product of genetics and heredity, and the races were almost separate from each other, following different paths of evolution (and therefore different levels of humanity). Lovecraft was hardly alone in using this now-discredited science to prop up his notions about “mongrels.” But even scientists and intellectuals of his time were moving far past these theories from the 19th century.

Lovecraft continued to speak of race over the years, and, in 1933, he wrote to J. Vernon Shea:

The problem of race and culture is by no means as simple as assumed either by the Nazis or by the rabble-catering equalitarian columnists of the Jew-York papers. Of course Hitler is an unscientific extremist in fancying that any racial strain can be reduced to theoretical purity, that the Nordic stock is intellectually and aesthetically superior to all others, and that even a trace of non-Nordic blood–or non-Aryan blood–is enough to alter the psychology and citizenly potentialities of an individual . . . . But the anti-Hitlerites are too cocksure when they maintain that the fallacy of theses points justifies a precisely opposite extremism . . . . Anybody can see for himself the difference between a tall, straight-nosed, fine-haired dolichocephalic Teuton or Celt (be he blond or dark) on the one hand, and a squat, swarthy Latin, aquiline Semite, or brachychephalic Slav on the other hand . . . . It is of course true that the cultural heritage is more influential than the biological, but only a freakish extremist would reduce the biological to neglibility . . . . The races are equal, but infinitely different–so that the cultural pattern of one is essentially unadaptable to any other. The ancient civilisation of China is not inferior to ours–yet it could not possibly suit us, any more than ours could suit a race of essentially Mongol descent.

While Lovecraft still appealed to outmoded science (note all the references to skull shape and size), he appears to have switched emphasis here and elsewhere to cultures as the main point of contention. These are what should not be mixed.

Despite this shift, premier Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi claims that he believed in the biological inferiority of black people (and “Australoids”) until he died. Lovecraft also maintained his sympathies for the Southern side of the Civil War. He did, however, repudiate the Ku Klux Klan, which he had previously approved of, and his initial admiration for, if not full support of, Hitler seems to have evaporated.

Some champion the idea that Lovecraft actually recanted his racism at the end of his life, but I see no real evidence of it. He may have realized that his scientific justifications for his views were wanting, but he merely admitted that his personal tastes were for an unsullied Anglo-Saxon culture-stream. To some extent, he admitted that he valued the “Nordic” above all else because it suited him, in much the way he liked a fine antique chair. He knew, ultimately, that he had a choice in admiring ancient Rome or Georgian England. He may not have fully realized that he had some say in how he regarded other human beings.

finlay lovecraft portrait

Lovecraft as Georgian gentleman, envisioned by pulp artist Virgil Finlay

When he wrote that letter to Shea, he was forty-three years old. He died less than four years later. If his views on race changed so little over three decades, how much can we expect them to had he lived longer? Would the Civil Rights Movement have really moved him, while he would be in his sixties and seventies? Again, as much as we might hope he would have changed, I have serious doubts. We, of course, will never know for sure.

And as it is, I may be giving Lovecraft too much credit. Fred Ludnow recently wrote an article on his blog, Lovecraftian Science, entitled “H.P. Lovecraft and the Pseudoscientific Study of Racism,” which states that Lovecraft’s scientific views regarding race never really changed (this is basically Joshi’s position as well). Ludnow surely has a better understanding of the matter than I do; perhaps Lovecraft’s backpedaling was mere rhetoric. Nonetheless, Ludnow’s frustration with Lovecraft’s myopia in this one area aligns with mine.

I have a bit more to say about the legacy of Lovecraft’s racism, which I will post soon.

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Some General Updates

It’s been a long time since I’ve posted anything here. I never intended to be a regular blogger, and my schedule has been extremely busy since my last post. You can see the results of some of that busy-ness on my credits page. There are a number of books that recently came out or are coming out that I copyedited, and a few writing credits (the third issue of The Arkham Gazette and Doors to Darkness should both be out fairly soon).

I’ve taken my last post and made it a bit more permanent, creating an entire series of pages under The Herbivore’s Convention Guide. First up is Comic-Con next week, so, if you are going and are at a loss for where to eat some good plant-based food, check it out. I hope this minor resource is of use.

And while I just said I never intended to be a regular blogger, I have some plans to make use of this space more frequently, contributing short gaming-related pieces. I’ve had some ideas bouncing around in my head that I want to get moving into the outside world. Perhaps after the impending round of conventions, I’ll do just that.

A Vegan at Gen Con

Gen ConHaving dietary restrictions while traveling can be a challenge, especially if you enjoy eating and hope for something that compromises neither your diet nor your tastes. Last year was my first Gen Con, as well as my first trip to Indianapolis, so I compiled a short list of vegan options beforehand. My initial quick search wasn’t promising, but a little more digging gave me a handful of places either close to the convention center or a relatively short walk or bus ride away. I arrived in Indianapolis assured that I wouldn’t have to eat the same thing over and over.

Here are the places I ate and my (somewhat hazy) impressions of them, starting with the closest to the convention center. There were a couple of other places I was aware of that I didn’t try (apparently there’s a vegan haggis at a nearby Scottish pub). If I try some new ones or others share their own food experiences with me, I’ll update this. I will definitely check out Three Carrots, the vegetarian restaurant which opened up recently east of Monument Circle; it’s about a fifteen-minute walk from the convention center.

The Convention Center

This wasn’t on my list. I had no expectation that I would find suitable food in a convention center. On my first day, however, I took a look and discovered that the sandwich vendors offered the Vegan of Fury (which was also their only vegetarian sandwich option). I ate three or four of the things over the course of the convention. Eight dollars got me a decent-sized sandwich (cold eggplant, peppers, purple onion, and probably a couple of other ingredients I’ve forgotten), a mound of potato chips, and a pickle spear. Here’s what I posted on social media at the time: “It may not be revelatory in its flavor, but the price is comparable to other nearby options, and I hope they keep offering food like it. It was sold out at the first stand I visited yesterday, so it seems to be doing all right.” It was convenient and followed the rules for food in the convention halls (no outside food allowed), and I thought it was a good idea to support them providing options for folks like me.

Duo’s Food Truck

I ran across DuDuo'so’s Kitchen while searching for options. It’s three miles away, but they also operate a food truck, and they had posted that they would be one of the many catering to the Gen Con crowd on Thursday and Friday. I grabbed some food there both days. They had a great quinoa salad, with almonds and fruit, and the bisque was nice, as well. I also tried their vegan magic cookie bars, similar to a Mounds bar. They’re small but satisfying. I really hope they’re back this year. Their Facebook page seems to be the best way to track the truck and its changing menu (they should have one or two vegan options a day).

Noodles & Company

This was what INoodles & Company found on my initial search. I was unfamiliar with this chain, and I’m not generally fond of franchises. But it looked like a decent option, and it still qualified as a new culinary experience. There are three noodle dishes on the menu that are vegan as is, as well as a soup, and there are numerous vegetarian options. It’s at 121 W. Maryland Street, Indianapolis IN 46225, just a couple of blocks from the convention center, and it’s open from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. The lines tend to be long, but they keep it moving, and they bring the food out quickly. I’m sure most of the ingredients are prepared well ahead of time and are just waiting to be tossed together, but the food was decent nonetheless. I ate there twice and had the Japanese Pan Noodles and the Indonesian Peanut Sauté. I preferred the latter, simply because it was a slightly novel flavor combination (it’s probably the first Indonesian food I’ve eaten, even in approximation).

Bazbeaux Pizza

This pizza placBazbeaux Pizzae has a number of vegetarian options, and the senza formaggio comes without cheese (it’s in the name!). They have a downtown location, about a twenty minute walk from the convention center, at 333 Massachusetts Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46204, with the hours of Monday–Thursday and Sunday: 11:00 a.m.–10:00 p.m., Friday–Saturday 11:00 a.m.–11:00 p.m. I went there Wednesday night after getting my badge. I’ll point out that Massachusetts Avenue runs diagonally, and if you turn the wrong way onto it, in the dark, after a flight, it may take you a little while to figure out that you’ve done so. At least that’s my experience. So I should point out nVonnegut Muralow that I’m fairly critical of pizza, having spent four years of my childhood in Naples. And, no, it’s not just because I get it without cheese. The point of good pizza is the crust and the sauce, as far as I’m concerned (and one of the traditional pizzas of Naples comes without cheese, and it’s incredible). I was also tired, and they were closing soon, so I ate fairly quickly. All that said, I found the pizza to be all right, perhaps a little disappointing. The ingredients seemed to be of good quality, and my experience was undoubtedly marred by shoveling hot food into my mouth quickly. I doubt I’ll be back, considering the distance and my aforementioned taste preferences, but it’s worth a look for those inclined. And you can pass by the Vonnegut mural (photo from indianapolismonthly.com; my own nighttime photograph turned out as poorly as one might expect).

Spice Nation

This is unfortunately both the farthest and best food I had the entire time. I believe it is the only completely vegetarian restaurant in the area, and it serves Southern Indian food, which were two reasons I hoped I’d be able to make it there. Sunday night, after the convention, I took a bus to the restaurant at 4225 Lafayette Road, Indianapolis, IN 46254. I had estimated it taking about twenty-five minutes, but the bus wasn’t on time, so it was closer to forty minutes to get there. Ultimately, I’m glad I went. The restaurant is located within an Indian grocery store; you walk down the entrance hall to the store, and the entrance to the fairly large restaurant is to the right. When I came in and the waiter seated me, he asked if I was vegan, which was nice. When I replied that I was, he informed me that the buffet had numerous clearly marked options. I really just wanted a dosa, one of my favorite things, and it became clear to me that they were only serving the weekend dinner buffet (which can be a dodgy proposition even in good restaurants). I asked if that was indeed the only option, and he assured me that I would find it quite enjoyable. Well, that was that, so I took my seat. My spirits were immediately elevated when he told me he’d be right out with my dosa (I hadn’t said anything about it; they simply give you one of the delightful things as part of the buffet). And the buffet itself was marvelous. I got to eat a number of dishes I rarely do, like korma, as well as try some things I’d never heard of. My waiter came by to tell me he’d just put out a pot of vegan chai. There were also two desserts I could eat.

They don’t have their own website, but, from what I gather on review sites, they’re under new management. This isn’t universally seen as a bad thing (there are at least some people who are happier with the food now, though there are a lot of complaints about the service). It was going to be difficult to squeeze it in as it was; now, I’m not sure how much effort I’ll make.

 

 

Into the New Year: the Past Is Prologue, But the Narrator Is Unreliable

Mother and Father

My mother loved readers

Holidays are many things. A reminder to cherish those in our lives. A time for coming together. A moment to pause and look backward and forward, seeing what has come before and where it might lead.

We visited my family for Thanksgiving this year, fortunate to have a rare opportunity to reconnect. On the first evening of our visit, we sat and chatted. At some point, I walked over to my mother, put my arm around her shoulder, and said, “And I’m thankful to you for teaching me how to read.” My mother chuckled with a smirk and replied, “Yeah, right….”

I’ve loved books as long as I can remember (and I have memories that go back to when I was three years old). Long before I could read them, I would look through them constantly. I was fascinated by the mysterious symbols of letters and other characters, which I knew had meaning just out of my reach.

On my first day of kindergarten, the boy who came into class behind me introduced himself and already knew my name, thanks to his ability to interpret what my name tag said. I was astonished that someone my own age had the power to divine meaning from the chaos of letters. That kid had a head start on me, and I wouldn’t catch up to him for the rest of our time together.

One day while my mother took me grocery shopping, I told her about what we had learned in class: how to make rhymes. I excitedly demonstrated, frog, log, dog, fog. My mother was proud of me. On another day, weeks later, on another shopping trip, my mother asked me what I had learned recently. I excitedly demonstrated, frog, log, dog, fog. My mother smiled at me and quickly made plans to talk to my teacher.

In that meeting, my mother asked my teacher if I shouldn’t be learning to read by now. No, she was sorry, she replied, I wasn’t ready for that. My mother learned that there were children being taught to read but that I would not be one of them. I watched as other children in my class would pull Go, Dog. Go! off the shelf and slowly but surely puzzle out the words within. I wanted to do that too so badly. The kindergarten year ended without me knowing more than my alphabet, my numbers, how to play nicely with others, and how to recite the worst poetry in the world.

Go, Dog, Go!

Despite what the Cat in the Hat might promise, the best I could do was rhyme one of the words in the title.

During the summer before I entered first grade, my mother sat with me and books like that one about the speeding canine and did what my teacher hadn’t even tried to do. But I can’t blame that teacher too much. I really was a poor student until I went to college. I was bright but undisciplined, kicked out of advanced programs in both junior high and high school. If I had been born a few years later, I probably would have been diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed drugs to focus me. So, my teacher had me figured out and used her energy on the children whom she expected to get more out of her attention.

My teacher, however, didn’t realize how much being able to read meant to me. My mother may not have either; she just wanted her son to be prepared for school. So over that summer I learned how to read.

On the first day of first grade, we were tested on our reading and math levels. I was immediately put into the highest reading group. From then on, I was constantly reading (though rarely what I was assigned to be reading, I’ll admit). In fifth grade, Ms. Cameron wrote a Halloween story starring her GATE program students, providing a characterization based on what she’d learned about us so far. At one point in the story, I wander away from the mystery involving all of us to read a book.

I love words, all the more because I fought for them. And my mother fought for them with me. At least, that’s how this foundational story goes in my personal history. My mother, it turns out, saw this differently. She remembered trying to teach me to read and failing. She’d expressed this regret to others over the years.

I provided her and my father with more than enough frustration during my school years as I failed classes that I should have mastered. That I well knew. What I didn’t know is that for thirty-five years we had walked around with diametrically opposed views of the events surrounding that summer, ones which filled us with very different emotions. It was one more frustration for her, not directed at me but at herself.

Memories are tricky. I’ve been fooled by them before. I was quite young. Perhaps I’m wrong. But I don’t think I am. Even if I’m wrong about immediately going into the top reading group in first grade, I highly doubt the bitter and spiteful Mrs. Anderson, who filled me with fear and anxiety, succeeded in teaching me much of anything–I left her class barely knowing simple arithmetic. Even if my own desire played a huge part in me figuring out what those letters meant when placed in order, I know my mother was a huge part of it too.

Certainly as far as foundational myths go, the one in which my mother, no matter how unsuited to the task, fought for me and succeeded is one that is more attractive than the one in which she failed. Ultimately, the important part of the story is that she fought for me, and that part is true. So whatever the fine particulars may be, I will continue to believe that I can read because of my mother. I will always be thankful for that.

I Went to Gen Con

Gen Con

I did. It was my first time and everything. Yes, I’m a little tardy in summing up my experience. I was out of town for two weeks for not only Gen Con but NecronomiCon as well, and had work waiting or on its way to me when I returned. But, finally, I’m passing on a few thoughts.

So, how was it? It was quite nice, really. As a first-time attendee of such an enormous and long-running convention dedicated to gaming, I was prepared to be overwhelmed, which was indeed the right mindset. Having experienced Comic-Con International‘s staggering expansion over the last twenty years, I have developed convention survival skills that serve me well. While Gen Con isn’t as big (you don’t need to squeeze through people or perpetually stand in line), it’s still difficult to see and do everything you’d like to.

Eternal LiesI got to reconnect with and meet a lot of people that I’ve worked with. I picked up contributor’s copies of Eternal Lies and The Esoterrorists, 2nd Edition from Simon Rogers of Pelgrane Press, who released ten new books at the convention. As with all things Pelgrane, they’re beautiful books, and I’m honored to have had a hand in them as a copyeditor. Eternal Lies is Trail of Cthulhu‘s foray into the kind of globe-trotting campaign that Lovecraftian roleplaying is renowned for, and The Esoterrorists, 2nd Edition is a refinement with additional material for the game of occult conspiracies that introduced GUMSHOE’s investigative genre emulation to roleplaying. I met Mike Mason at the Chaosium booth, congratulated him on Call of Cthulhu‘s 7th editiThe Esoterrorists, 2nd Editionon, and told him how much my group enjoyed playtesting it. His new role as line editor hadn’t been announced yet, so I didn’t have an opportunity to congratulate him on that as well. He gave me a print copy of the Call of Cthulhu 7th Edition Quick-Start Rules (the updated version is now available for download). I met lots of other great people and chatted with them about their games, and I attended some instructive panels on freelancing in the industry.

Gen Con’s a game convention, but I didn’t sign up for any beforehand for a couple of reasons. Again, not having attended before, I wasn’t sure how much time I could devote to that activity. Also, I wasn’t able to log on when game registration went live, and, considering what I’d heard about how quickly games fill up, I wasn’t surprised that there wasn’t much available for me. I started hearing about Games on Demand in the days before the convention, so I knew to check that out.

I don’t have a lot of experience with playing games in convention settings, so the hard-working folks behind this have set the high standard that I will now judge all such activities by. It was an excellent opportunity to try out different games. The flexibility Games on Demand provides worked out just great, and I got to play in five fun games over the course of the convention (and if I’d wanted more, I’m sure I could have gotten into some). It could sometimes be hard to hear over all the commotion, but I’m sure players at the adjoining tables were occasionally frustrated by my own volume.

I played School Daze written and run by Tracy Barnett and Carolina Death Crawl presented by Adam Drew. I played in a Dungeon World game run by Will Hindmarch, the head writer of Eternal Lies; I also played Always/Never/Now, his cyberpunk game based on Lady Blackbird, run by Mark Causey. And I got to try out Monsterhearts, run by Anne, a game I’d been intrigued by for a while. I read it a couple of months ago, and it was definitely interesting but not necessarily something I foresaw getting a group together for, especially  for a campaign. With the wrong group of players, Monsterhearts could be a disaster. That’s true of any game, but the sexually charged subject matter in this game makes the chance of blundering into the wrong group and having an uncomfortable experience seem a little higher than usual. I’m quite happy that I had a great time with it, developing more of an emotional attachment to the characters than I almost ever do, especially in such a short time. I’d love to be able to explore that particular story further.

Sex has never been a big part of my roleplaying experience. Even in games where players take more time with creating backgrounds and developing characters during play, romantic connections are rare or an afterthought. And, when I’m the GM, it’s not something I press. But thinking back on it lately, I realized there were more positive experiences with it in my history than I initially remembered, some quite recent. It was far easier for me to recall the awkward or annoying experiences, the ones that help make me trepidatious about including such material. It’s a quandry that we are generally more comfortable with roleplaying violence than we are with romance and sex. I know I’m not alone in this; it’s been a fairly frequent subject of discussion lately. Here are two recent Google Hangouts on the part sex can have in roleplaying: Indie+ Sex and Dice, with game designers discussing how it factors into design and gameplay, and Sex & RPGs, where two of the Games on Demand folks discuss how they approach sex in their games.

The X-CardI also got to experience the X-Card at Games on Demand, a device for creating a safe playing space by allowing any player at any time to non-verbally indicate that the game has veered into uncomfortable material. Of the five games I played, only one didn’t utilize it (and, in that one, we had a discussion beforehand about what themes we didn’t want to include). After its introduction each time, the card sat in the center of the table, accessible but, ultimately, unused. Regardless of its inactivation, I think its presence was a positive one. Just because no one at any point saw fit to use it doesn’t mean that it wasn’t doing its job. I found it reassuring, even though there’s very little, at least in the abstract, that I am likely to object to in a game (it depends on presentation, and I’m more likely to be annoyed than outright offended). Possibly I was more reassured to know that everyone else had recourse to it, in case I or anyone else verged into uncomfortable territory. Certainly, when you’re playing a game like Monsterhearts with complete strangers, a device like the X-Card can be very welcome indeed.

So I did indeed have a great time, both productive and fun. I’m going to do my level best to get there next year. And I expect I’ll make some time for games.

I Eagerly Await Your Counterfeit Check

Dear “Joan Barnett,”

Thank you so much for contacting me regarding the revision and editing work you need done. I occasionally get emails from people I’ve never interacted with before, inquiring about my services. It’s always a nice surprise to meet a prospective new client this way, and this, in itself, isn’t particularly odd or suspicious. When I saw your subject line, WRITER/EDITOR NEEDED, I thought, “Hey, that’s me!” And you certainly need help with your informative pamphlet for teens about the dangers of STDs. It looks like you’re trying to do some good work here.

I can’t wait to dive into it. I’m not sure why your sponsor has already sent a check. I haven’t really done anything yet, except exchange a few emails with you to discuss the details of this very important and completely genuine project. I’m also quite sorry to hear that, in his haste, he wrote it for some unspecified amount more than what he should have. Since I never specified an amount, either, can we really be sure he wrote it out for the wrong amount? I mean, all I’ve provided is an hourly rate and an estimate of how long the project will take. Did I mention that I haven’t actually performed any work yet? I appreciate your eagerness, but I’ll invoice you, don’t worry.

In any case, that “extra fund is needed to provide shelter and drug for less privilege kids and organize seminar about the STD/AIDS program.” I’m not sure about that. I hope you mean “medicine” rather than “drug.” I mean, I have my doubts about the whole “drug war” thing, but I don’t want to be involved in anything nefarious. Anyway, the simplest solution would be to cancel the check, all of which is overpayment at this point, after all. I’ll happily mail it back to you or shred it. But if you’d rather I deposit the check and then let you know I’ve done so, I suppose that’s reasonable enough. Then you’ll let me know where to send the excess amount (don’t forget to also let me know what that excess amount is). Again, that all seems needlessly complicated, and I’d hate for anything to go horribly, horribly wrong somewhere in the transaction. I hate to think of those kids not getting the shelter, unspecified pharmaceuticals, and informative seminars they need (be sure to distribute that pamphlet to them as soon as I’ve finished it for you).

Sincerely,
Christopher Smith Adair

So, it’ll come as no surprise to anyone who waded through the above that this is all a scam, a phishing attempt targeting writers and editors. I wasn’t aware such a particular variation existed until earlier this morning. Nanci Hamilton writes about her own experiences with this type of fraud here: http://www.hamiltonpdx.com/blogs/index.php/email-scam-detailed. The emails she received are quite similar to the ones I did. Mine were less elaborate and didn’t provide any Youtube links. Either the person or persons involved are trying a variety of approaches or they’ve developed them over time. In any case, I’m glad I figured it out early enough. I’ve filed a complaint with the FTC, and, once the bogus check arrives, I’ll alert USPS. In the meantime, I have some actual work to do.

ACHTUNG! Trail of Cthulhu

My Trail of Cthulhu conversions of Modiphius‘s first two Achtung! Cthulhu scenarios are now available.ACHTUNG! CTHULHU The Achtung! Cthulhu setting pits agents of the Allied nations against those of the Axis as they seek to harness the cosmic power of the Mythos. The backdrop of WW II has previously appeared in Cthulhoid roleplaying, but Achtung! Cthulhu is the first setting to provide substantial material for games set in that era. Here’s a link to a bundle deal on the PDFs (where they can also be purchased individually).

The scenarios are Three Kings and Heroes of the Sea, the first two parts of the episodic Zero Point campaign, written by Sarah Newton. Each stands alone, providing an individual mission to challenge the players. Modiphius previously provided versions for Call of Cthulhu, Realms of Cthulhu, and PDQ. This is one of the benefits of PDF publishing, though print versions will follow at some point. Based on the great success of their recent Kickstarter—which started with two books and funded to about five times that, with the addition of miniatures, a board game, and more—this line will have a long and healthy life.

My conversions provide statistics and rules, including, of course, Trail of Cthulhu‘s method of providing clues. While these scenarios have more opportunities for furious action than Lovecraftian ones stereotypically do, they have many of the familiar qualities of investigation, cautious approaches, and mind-shattering horror. If you are unfamiliar with Ken Hite’s Cthulhu Mythos version of Robin D. Laws’s GUMSHOE rules, more information can be found on Pelgrane Press’s website.

While a lot of conversion work is more or less mechanical, though requiring creativity and judgment (this stat equals this one, this Call of Cthulhu skill used to find the clue is equivalent to this Trail of Cthulhu one, etc.), this project’s setting provided further interesting challenges. Sarah Newton had provided CoC rules for vehicle combat and large-scale engagements (including rules for PCs commanding such forces). I wrote rules for these aspects of warfare to fit ToC‘s style, and this was probably the most extensive design work I did on these. Also of interest to Keepers are the numerous spells I converted (three for Three Kings and seventeen for Heroes of the Sea, with two overlapping between them). Some of these are spells I’ve converted in the past, but I looked at each one to determine if changes needed to be made to fit the scenario or my own evolving sensibilities.